Home Auto News Daimler’s Hydrogen-Powered Semi-Truck Completes 650-Mile Journey on Single Refuel

Daimler’s Hydrogen-Powered Semi-Truck Completes 650-Mile Journey on Single Refuel

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Daimler GenH2 Truck Test

Last week, Daimler Truck revealed the triumphant completion of a test run for its prototype vehicle, the Mercedes-Benz GenH2 Truck. The hydrogen-electric semi-trailer successfully navigated a 1,047-kilometer (650-mile) distance on just one hydrogen refueling.

The truck accomplished the journey across Germany, commencing from Woerth am Rhein and culminating in Berlin, while emitting no carbon dioxide. The test was executed with the truck carrying a full load, with a gross weight of 80,000 pounds, thereby mirroring the range commonly achieved by traditional diesel-fueled trucks.

Overview of Volvo XC40

Initially showcased in 2020 as part of the Mercedes-Benz GenH2 Truck concept, the vehicle employs a dual electric motor powertrain. Each of these motors is capable of supplying a steady 308 horsepower and 1,163 pound-feet of torque, with peak capacities reaching 442 horsepower and 1,527 pound-feet.

Generally, these motors source their energy from a hydrogen fuel-cell stack. However, during high-demand scenarios, supplementary energy is provided by a battery with limited capacity, which is primarily employed for temporary needs such as overtaking or ascending steep gradients.

Cellcentric’s Dual Fuel-Cell System for Heavy-Duty Utilization

The GenH2 Truck incorporates liquid hydrogen storage tanks, a choice made due to their compact size compared to tanks needed for gaseous hydrogen. Each of the two tanks weighs 88 pounds. Daimler Trucks states that the stored hydrogen remains adequately chilled for an extended period without the need for active cooling, thanks to insulation.

Cellcentric, a collaborative venture between Daimler Trucks and Volvo Group’s commercial vehicle division, is behind the development of the fuel cell elements in the powertrain. The company has previously alluded to mass-producing fuel cells by the year 2025.

The prototype used for the test is modeled on the Mercedes-Benz Actros. However, its powertrain may eventually find applications in other vehicles under the Daimler Truck portfolio, including brands like Freightliner, Western Star, and Fuso, as well as Volvo Group-operated brands.

Daimler Trucks has not limited its focus to hydrogen-electric vehicles alone. The company is also in the process of designing battery-electric trucks intended for shorter distances, and has already introduced models such as the Fuso eCanter and the Mercedes-Benz eActros to the market.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Daimler GenH2 Truck Test

What vehicle did Daimler Truck recently test?

Daimler Truck recently conducted a successful test of its prototype, the Mercedes-Benz GenH2 Truck, which is a hydrogen-electric semi-trailer.

How far did the GenH2 Truck travel on a single fill of hydrogen?

The GenH2 Truck completed a distance of 1,047 kilometers or 650 miles on just one fill of hydrogen.

What was the environmental impact of this test run?

The test run was conducted with zero CO2 emissions, making it an environmentally-friendly alternative to traditional diesel-powered trucks.

Where did the trial take place?

The test journey commenced in Woerth am Rhein and concluded in Berlin, Germany.

What was the load capacity during the trial?

The truck carried a full load with a gross weight of 80,000 pounds, which is comparable to what is covered by current diesel-powered trucks.

Can you provide details about the truck’s powertrain?

The GenH2 Truck features a dual electric motor powertrain. Each motor can deliver a continuous 308 horsepower and 1,163 pound-feet of torque, with peaks of 442 horsepower and 1,527 pound-feet.

How is the truck’s energy sourced?

Generally, the motors draw energy from a hydrogen fuel-cell stack. However, during high-demand situations, energy is supplemented by a battery with limited capacity.

What type of hydrogen storage does the GenH2 Truck utilize?

The truck is equipped with liquid hydrogen storage tanks. Each of the two tanks weighs 88 pounds and they were chosen for their compact size compared to gaseous hydrogen tanks.

Who developed the fuel cell component of the GenH2 Truck?

The fuel cell component was developed by Cellcentric, a joint venture between Daimler Trucks and the Volvo Group’s commercial vehicle division.

Are there plans to integrate this technology into other truck brands?

Yes, the powertrain used in the GenH2 Truck prototype could potentially be incorporated into trucks and buses from other Daimler Truck brands like Freightliner, Western Star, and Fuso, as well as brands operated by the Volvo Group.

Is Daimler Trucks focusing solely on hydrogen-electric vehicles?

No, Daimler Trucks is also developing battery-electric trucks for shorter routes and has already released models like the Fuso eCanter and the Mercedes-Benz eActros.

More about Daimler GenH2 Truck Test

  • Daimler Truck Official Press Release
  • Mercedes-Benz GenH2 Truck Concept Overview
  • Cellcentric Joint Venture Information
  • Volvo Group Commercial Vehicles
  • Alternative Energy in the Transportation Industry
  • Daimler’s Battery-Electric Models: Fuso eCanter and Mercedes-Benz eActros

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7 comments

GreenFuturist October 2, 2023 - 5:42 pm

Zero emissions and a full load? This is where the industry needs to head, kudos to Daimler for leading the way.

Reply
JohnDoe October 2, 2023 - 7:05 pm

Wow, 650 miles on a single fill of hydrogen? That’s seriously impressive. Daimler’s really pushing the envelope here.

Reply
TruckFan October 2, 2023 - 9:53 pm

308 hp and over 1000 lb-ft of torque? those are some beefy numbers for a green truck. Impressive.

Reply
Investor101 October 2, 2023 - 10:14 pm

If Daimler pulls this off at scale, they could disrupt the whole freight industry. Keep an eye on their stock for sure.

Reply
EmilyTech October 3, 2023 - 12:59 am

Daimler and Volvo together on this? that’s like the Avengers of the trucking world teaming up! Can’t wait to see what they do next.

Reply
EcoWarrior October 3, 2023 - 1:59 am

liquid hydrogen tanks, eh? sounds complicated but if it’s more efficient i’m all for it.

Reply
AutoAnalyst October 3, 2023 - 5:03 pm

The tech behind this is pretty complex. dual electric motors, fuel cell stack and a backup battery for high-load? That’s some advanced engineering.

Reply

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